Luckily I am not a Christian

“Luckily I am not a Christian,” a young student said to Janet Robertson after she shared about her Christian journey in his class at a Taiwanese university. This statement shook her to her core. How could anyone think he was “lucky” not to know Christ? The young student went on to tell her that he did not know a lot about Christianity, but lately had heard the Christian church in Taiwan speaking out against gay people using some very unpleasant words. Therefore, he felt “lucky” he was not a Christian. This got her thinking about what it truly means to “Take the name of the Lord in vain.” Is it just simply swearing? Or could it be something much deeper.

LUCKILY I AM NOT A CHRISTIAN

“Luckily I am not a Christian,” a young student said to Janet Robertson after she shared about her Christian journey in his class at a Taiwanese university. This statement shook her to her core. How could anyone think he was “lucky” not to know Christ? The young student went on to tell her that he did not know a lot about Christianity, but lately had heard the Christian church in Taiwan speaking out against gay people using some very unpleasant words.

Therefore, he felt “lucky” he was not a Christian. This got her thinking about what it truly means to “Take the name of the Lord in vain.” Is it just simply swearing? Or could it be something much deeper. The word “vain” means, producing no results; useless. Only 2% of Taiwanese are Christian; 98% have not heard that God loves them, but have heard that God does not like gay people. If the response to the church is “luckily I am not a Christian” then surely the message is in vain.

What is your opinion on this statement?